Duval County Public Schools

Tel: 904-390-2000         1701 Prudential Drive

                                      Jacksonville, FL 32207

Duval County Public Schools is an equal opportunity school district. 

Duval Schools has policies and procedures in place to protect its employees, students and anyone associated with the District from discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment or retaliation. It prohibits discrimination based upon race, color, gender, age, religion, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, political or religious beliefs, national or ethnic origin, pregnancy, genetic information or veteran status.

Web Accessibility

  • Instagram
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • LinkedIn Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon

What will a Half Penny

Do for Our Schools?

5 Reasons for Change

Provide all students with a learning environment that improves achievement.

5

Build new schools in areas where they are needed and remove as many portables as possible.

4

Consolidation of very small schools to increase resources for teaching and learning experiences and cut overhead.

3

Eliminate over $1 billion in backlogged maintenance caused by declining state funding and the impact of very old, deteriorating school buildings.

2

Safety and security upgrades at every traditional Duval County Public School.

Why is it Needed? State Cuts and Aging Schools.

Duval Schools Are Among The Oldest In The State

Orange

Years

20

Palm Beach

Years

21

Broward

Years

28

Pinellas

Years

32

Hillsborough

Years

33

Miami-Dade

Years

33

Duval

Years

44

Average Age of Florida Schools in the 7 Largest Districts (Years)

24% Funding Loss

State Funding Cuts Since 2008 have reduced facility funding to almost $300 million over 11 years. This has caused back- logged maintenance of $243 million. Because of the age of the schools, backlogged maintenance will balloon to $1 billion in five years. 

Where We Are in the Process

The Duval County School Board's resolution to ask voters for the 1/2 penny tax was sent to the Jacksonville City Council in May, 2019. The Council must place the referendum on an election ballot, giving voters the opportunity to create this revenue source for public schools.

The Jacksonville City Counsel voted on August 27 to withdraw their bill to place the referendum on the 2019 ballot. This action ends any prospect of voters having their voice heard in 2019. 

The School Board voted on August 28 to hire legal counsel to represent the Board's interest in this matter. 

What You Need to Know

Our children deserve great schools. Learn how you can help.

Why is a voluntary half-penny sales tax being proposed? 

There are three major issues facing our schools.

How do improved school buildings contribute to student achievement?

They contribute to student achievement in several important ways:

Why should I support this tax, if  I don't have children in school?

Public education impacts everyone.

How will I know if the school district is doing what it says it will do with the money?

A Citizens Oversight Committee...

How much will this tax cost me?

A typical family in Duval would pay about $6 per month.

Will this tax last forever?

No. It expires in 15 years.

Does any of this money go to the School Board or administrative salaries?

Absolutely not.

Why not use impact fees to meet the schools' needs?

Impact fees can't be used for all schools in all areas.

Doesn't money from the Florida Lottery fund schools?

The schools receive little money from the lottery.

Can't the district borrow money by issuing bonds?

It isn't a good idea. Here's why.

What is the difference between capital and operational money?

Capital dollars are for buildings and operation money is for teacher salaries.

How does support for Duval County Public Schools compare with other districts?

We are one of the few counties in Florida that doesn't invest in schools this way.

What would happen if voters do not approve the sales tax for education?

Failure to get support would mean students continue to sit in aging, rapidly deteriorating schools.

How would the additional funds raised through the sales tax be used?

100 % of the funds would be used to help our aging schools.

What question will voters see on the ballot?

Building Construction Standards: Traditional and Charter School Comparison

State requirements dictate that public schools meet higher building standards than charters. 

1.jpg

Financial Implications: How a 1/2 Penny Adds Up to Great Schools for Duval

Duval County Public Schools has engaged with financial advisors from PFM LLC to forecast revenue